Otobuxi

The concept

The Otobuxi (pronounced Auto Boxy) is a smart transit vehicle designed to travel in narrow residential streets.

The background

Most residential streets are not serviced by city buses which are either too heavy, bulky or noisy for the residents. There are also less users to fill up a complete city bus so the Otobuxi could bridge the gap with its medium capacity. Most residential streets are not serviced by city buses which are either too heavy, bulky or noisy for the residents. There are also less users to fill up a complete city bus so the Otobuxi could bridge the gap with its medium capacity.

How it works

With its four wheel steering and electric motors the Otobuxi can travel with ease, and quietly on any urban street.  It can accommodate up to 12 passengers and it doesn’t require any driver since it will be equipped with a driverless driving system such as the one used in the famous Google Cars.

To recharge its batteries on the move the Otobuxi would use automatic inductive power transfer like the ones currently being tested by Bombardier’s Primove division. To get onboard, each passenger would request a pick-up by using a smartphone app & pay the fare with the same app or with a microchip payment system like Paypass from Mastercard.  An intelligent transit calculator would automatically propose 2-3 itineraries to bring you to your final destination by using a combination of vehicles connected to the transit network (Otobuxi, Metro, Light rail, Buses, Commuter Trains, Taxi etc.)

What it’s used for

The Otobuxi could pick you up right in front of your house, exactly when you need a lift and it would adapt its trip based on your priorities (Speed, Cost, City Highlights etc.). It’s a new kind of vehicle that would fill the gap between cars, taxi cabs and buses hence its name ‘Oto’ for automobile ‘bu’ for city Buses and ‘xi’ for taxis.

The Designer

The Otobuxi concept was developed in collaboration with Jan Bujnak, an industrial designer from the Slovak Republic. Jan graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Bratislava and works as a freelance designer. Jan has also produced the concept images for the Sekonride powersport simulator and the Typhon personal hovercraft.

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