Aronax

The Concept

The Aronax is a biomimetic submarine designed to bring two people deep down into the vast unknowns of the ocean and provide a ‘one of a kind’ nature blending experience.

Origin of the Idea

The great depths of our vast oceans remain one of humankind’s last exploration frontiers. I think we need to approach and discover nature with more respect, and one way to do this is by creating bio-mimetic vehicles. The name Aronax comes from one of the main characters from the book Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, named was Pierre Aronax. I wanted to create a submarine that would blend into the sea more easily and also use a propulsion system similar to a giant squid.

How It Works

The Aronax has ten long, flexible arms, all of which are made of artificial muscles. When given an impulse, these muscles would contract, creating backwards force and propelling the Aronax forward. The muscles would then relax; creating a cycle of movement that requires little energy, although the Aronax would be equipped with rechargeable high energy density batteries.

Artificial Intelligence technology would allow each tentacle to monitor its environment and react accordingly, especially if something touched it. In such a case, the Aronax would be able to free itself if one of its tentacles became stuck or be gentle if a fish or sea creature came in contact with it.

The Aronax’s head would be made of a transparent, pressure resistant canopy that would allow both passengers a 360-degree view of the underwater scenery. This panoramic cockpit would use augmented reality to improve the viewing experience of the passengers to display information, and colourful animation and videos.

The Market

The shape of the Aronax and its ability to mimic a squid’s movement would allow it to blend into the environment, allowing the passengers to view and observe animals in a way that would be much more difficult with conventional submarines. The technology for the artificial muscle is being developed today for other applications (see current work Dr. Ray H. Baughman at the University of Texas at Dallas) so the next step would be to see if this technology can be used in an underwater electric vehicle.

The Designer

I would like thank Boris Schwarzer, who created the renderings of the Aronax. Boris is based in Michigan, U.S.A. He went to the College of Creative Studies, and he works as a contractual designer for the Ford Motor Company. Boris also created the images of the Solar Express spaceship (view our video) and the Cityjet, an urban quad concept powered by a fuel cell.

SHARE